Associate Professor Elizabeth Nora McMahon

Associate Professor Elizabeth Nora McMahon

Fields of research: Literary Studies, Cultural Studies
Campus: Kensington
Tags: Languages and literature, Other Cultural Understanding

Dr Elizabeth McMahonis an Associate Professor in the School of the Arts and Media.  Her research interestes are in Australian literature, Island Studies and Gender studies.

Her current research, funded by an ARC Discovery grant, is titled Our Island Home: The Shifting Map of Australian Literature.  Dr McMahon is a member of the AUSTLIT research group, an inter-university collaboration for electronic resources in Australian literature funded by the ARC’s LIEF program. She has also...

Dr Elizabeth McMahonis an Associate Professor in the School of the Arts and Media.  Her research interestes are in Australian literature, Island Studies and Gender studies.

Her current research, funded by an ARC Discovery grant, is titled Our Island Home: The Shifting Map of Australian Literature.  Dr McMahon is a member of the AUSTLIT research group, an inter-university collaboration for electronic resources in Australian literature funded by the ARC’s LIEF program. She has also published widely on the representation of gender and sexuality in Australian writing, and recently edited, with Dr Brigitta Olubas, a new collection on Patrick White. Since 2008 she also co-edits Southerly, Australian oldest literary journal.

ELizabeth has extensive experience as a supervisor with eight PhD successful completions and 6 current students. The topics of these theses range from Australian, New Zealand and and US literature, to Foucauldian theory, and trash aesthetics.

Contact

+61 2 9385 1164

Research Activities

Our Island Home: the shifting map of Australian literature

Project

Our Island Home: the shifting map of Australian literature

This project will show how Australia's unique status as an island continent has shaped Australian literature. Key questions posed are: How was the colonial cartography of the Australian mainland and islands represented in literature? Why did Australia increasingly identify as an island rather than a continent from the 1940s? How did this shift in emphasis re-form Australian literature? How do these fluctuations position Australian literature at this second great era of globalisation?