Researcher

Dr Joanne Reed

Keywords

Biography

Joanne’s research focuses on autoimmune diseases, particularly the origin and role of autoantibodies. Joanne completed her PhD at Flinders University, investigating antigen expression and autoantibody specificity in Sjogren’s syndrome and lupus.

Upon completion of her PhD she received an NHMRC Fellowship to undertake postdoctoral training at New York University. At NYU, Joanne studied how autoantibodies mediate tissue injury in neonatal...view more

Joanne’s research focuses on autoimmune diseases, particularly the origin and role of autoantibodies. Joanne completed her PhD at Flinders University, investigating antigen expression and autoantibody specificity in Sjogren’s syndrome and lupus.

Upon completion of her PhD she received an NHMRC Fellowship to undertake postdoctoral training at New York University. At NYU, Joanne studied how autoantibodies mediate tissue injury in neonatal lupus.

In 2013 Joanne returned to Australia and joined Prof Christopher Goodnow’s group at the Australian National University, with the goal of developing new genomic approaches to study autoimmune disease. She then moved with Prof Goodnow in 2015 to establish an Immunogenomics lab at the Garvan Institute.

Joanne's current research uses next generation sequencing and single cell transcriptomics to study antibody repertoires and genetic variants in patients with autoimmune disease.

 


My Grants

2018 - NHMRC New Investigator Project Grant - Rogue B cell Clones in Patients with Autoimmune Disease

2018 - Rebecca L Cooper Project Grant - Targeting Rogue Clones in Systemic Autoimmune Rheumatic Diseases 

2017 - NSW Health Early to Mid Career Fellowship - Improving diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune disease by deep sequencing antibody repertoires

2016 - Arthritis Australia SA LSS Support Group Grant - Self-reactive immunoglobulin repertoires in Sjogren's syndrome and Lupus

2013 - Arthritis Foundation America Postdoctoral Fellowship - Role of IRF5 in mediating antibody induced tissue injury

2012 - American Heart Association Postdoctoral Fellowship - A protective role for beta2-glycoprotein I in anti-Ro60 and ssRNA mediated inflammation in congenital heart block

2010 - NHMRC CJ Martin Overseas Training Fellowship - Mechanisms of autoantibody-mediated tissue injury in congenital heart block


My Qualifications

2009 – PhD, Flinders University of South Australia - Australia
2004 – Bachelor of Biotechnology (Honours – First Class), Flinders University of South Australia - Australia


My Awards

2017 - Lupus Travel Grant and Scientific Presentation Award
2017 - Young Garvan Award
2011 – Sjogren’s syndrome Foundation of America Outstanding Abstract Award
2009 – Australian Rheumatology Association New Investigator Award
2008/7/6 – Australian Rheumatology Association Philip Alper’s Prize and Travel Grant
2004 – Amgen Prize for best honours thesis in South Australia
2004 – Australian Biotechnology Association honours thesis prize
2004 – University Medal


My Research Activities

The Rheumatology and Autoimmunity group is focused on determining how self-reactive immune cells develop, persist and cause severe pathology in patients with rheumatic autoimmune disease. The purpose of this research is to uncover more specific therapeutic targets that can be used to eliminate self-reactive, pathogenic immune cells while preserving the rest of the immune system.

Autoimmune disease occurs when immune cells 'go rogue' and attack healthy parts of the body, instead of attacking infectious microbes. There are over 100 different autoimmune diseases, which affect 5-10% of the population and are a major cause of chronic disease in our society. Without a cure, individuals afflicted by these diseases face ongoing clinical care based on suppressing the whole immune system. Current clinical practise treats the symptoms of disease rather than the cause because we don’t have a way to identify and eradicate the individual cells of the immune system that have gone rogue.

Our group has developed innovative cellular genomics technology incorporating single cell sequencing and multi-parameter flow cytometry to identify and isolate self-reactive rogue B cells from patients with the autoimmune diseases Sjögren’s syndrome and lupus. This research has uncovered therapeutic targets and allowed us to track the evolution of these disease causing B cells.

We are currently recruiting enthusiastic students who are interested in using cutting-edge genomic technology to learn about fundamental mechanisms of the immune system and impact treatment strategies and outcomes in patients with autoimmune diseases.


My Research Supervision


Supervision keywords


Areas of supervision

PhD, honours and UROP positions available. 

 

Project: Using genomic technology to study the rogue cells that cause autoimmune disease

Discipline: Immunology

Project level: PhD/Honours

Supervisor: Prof Chris Goodnow & Dr Joanne Reed

Project commencement: Variable

Summary: Autoimmune disease occurs when immune cells "go rogue" and attack healthy parts of the body, instead of attacking infectious microbes. There are over 100 different autoimmune diseases, which affects 5-10% of the population and are a major cause of chronic disease in our society. Without a cure, individuals afflicted by these diseases face ongoing clinical care based on suppresing the whole immune system. Current clinical practice treats the symptoms of disease rather than the cause because we don't have a way to identify and eradicate the individual cells of the immune system that have gone rogue. Our group has developed innovative cellular genomics technology incorporating single cell sequencing and multi-parameter flow cytometry to identify and isolate rogue B cells from patients with the autoimmune diseases Sjogren's syndrome and lupus. This research has uncovered therapeutic targets and allowed us to trace the evolution of these disease causing cells.

We are currently recruiting enthusiastic students who are interested in using cutting-edge genomic technology to learn about fundamental mechanisms of the immune system and impact treatment strategied and outcomes in patients with autoimmune diseases.

Contact: Dr Joanne Reed at j.reed@garvan.org.au


Currently supervising

PhD students

International visiting students

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Location

Garvan Institute of Medical Research

Contact

+61292958480

ORCID as entered in ROS