Researcher

Dr Kate Poole

Field of Research (FoR)

Biography

Dr Kate Poole received her PhD from the University of Adelaide in 2002 before moving to Germany to undertake postdoctoral studies. Whilst in Germany Kate worked at the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics and the Technische Universitaet Dresden. Kate then spent a couple of years working in industry for the atomic force microscopy company JPK Instruments, AG. In 2008 Kate returned to science, taking a postdoctoral...view more

Dr Kate Poole received her PhD from the University of Adelaide in 2002 before moving to Germany to undertake postdoctoral studies. Whilst in Germany Kate worked at the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics and the Technische Universitaet Dresden. Kate then spent a couple of years working in industry for the atomic force microscopy company JPK Instruments, AG. In 2008 Kate returned to science, taking a postdoctoral position at the Max Delbruck Center for Molecular Medicine. In 2012, Kate received the Cecile Vogt Fellowship which allowed her to establish her research independance, also at the Max Delbruck Center. Kate has recently returned from Germany to join the Department of Physiology, School of Medical Sciences, as a lecturer. Her research interests revolve around understanding how cells sense their physical environment.

The sensing of and discrimination between different physical inputs is critical in the function of many cells and tissues in multicellular organisms; an acute response to mechanical stimuli underpins our senses of touch and hearing, integrated sensing of changing mechanical loads is fundamental for maintaining cartilage and the vasculature, and migratory cells (such as fibroblasts in wound healing or tumour cells during metastasis) can probe the mechanical properties of their surroundings by applying forces at cell-matrix contact points. Kate is studying the molecular mechanisms of cellular sensing of physical stimuli across a number of mammalian systems: in touch sensation in the somatic sensory system, the homeostatic maintenance of cartilage and in melanoma progression and metastasis.


My Research Activities

Recent Publications:

MR Servin-Vences, M Moroni, GR Lewin, K Poole. Direct measurement of TRPV4 and PIEZO1 activity reveals multiple mechanotransduction pathways in chondrocytes. eLife 2017 doi: 10.7554/eLife.21074

 

C Wetzel, S Pifferi, C Picci, C Gök, D Hoffmann, KK Bali, A Lampe, L Lapatsina, R Fleischer, ES Smith, V Bégay, M Moroni, L Estebanez, J Kühnemund, J Walcher, E Specker, M Neuenschwander, JP von Kries, V Haucke, R Kuner, JFA Poulet, J Schmoranzer, K Poole§, GR Lewin§ Small-molecule inhibition of STOML3 oligomerization reverses pathological mechanical hypersensitivity. Nat Neurosci. 2017 doi:10.1038/nn.4454. 

 

M. Grandin, M. Meier, J.G. Delcros, D. Nikodemus, R. Reuten, T.R. Patel, D. Goldschneider, G. Orriss, N. Krahn, A. Boussouar, R. Abes, Y. Dean, D. Neves, A. Bernet, S. Depil, F. Schneiders, K. Poole, R. Dante, M. Koch, P. Mehlen, J. Stetefeld. Structural Decoding of the Netrin-1/UNC5 Interaction and its Therapeutical Implications in Cancers. Cancer Cell 2016, 29(2):173-85

 

K. Poole, R. Herget, L. Lapatsina, HD. Ngo, G.R. Lewin.  Tuning Piezo ion channels to detect molecular-scale movements relevant for fine touch. Nat Commun 2014, doi: 10.1038/ncomms4520


My Research Supervision


Supervision keywords


Areas of supervision

Honours, Masters, PhD


Currently supervising

Jessica Richardson (PhD student)

View less

Contact

93851764