Dr Stephanie J Hollis

Dr Stephanie J Hollis

Fields of research: Emergency Medicine, Neurosciences, Sports Medicine
Campus: Kensington

Dr Stephanie Hollis is a Research Fellow with the Simpson Centre for Health Services Research in the South Western Sydney Clinical School and Australian Institute for Health Services Research, UNSW. She is currently involved in post-doctoral research investigating the recent implementation of Medical Emergency Team protocol in NSW hospitals. The current research has been funded by an NHMRC Project Grant.

With the explosion of knowledge and technology, the role of the acute hospital is...

Dr Stephanie Hollis is a Research Fellow with the Simpson Centre for Health Services Research in the South Western Sydney Clinical School and Australian Institute for Health Services Research, UNSW. She is currently involved in post-doctoral research investigating the recent implementation of Medical Emergency Team protocol in NSW hospitals. The current research has been funded by an NHMRC Project Grant.

With the explosion of knowledge and technology, the role of the acute hospital is changing and has meant that the hospital population is becoming more acute. Some hospitals have adapted to cope with this increasing severity of illness by investing in expensive monitoring systems and specialised Intensive Care Units. However, patients who have been transferred to the general ward from these units are at risk of serious complications, cardiac arrest and death.

Research has shown that morbidity and mortality rates for in-hospital cardiac arrests have not changed since the invention of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation in the 1960’s, with 90% of all in-hospital cardiac arrest patients dying. Other studies have shown that up to 60–80% of these patients have a slow and well-documented deterioration prior to their cardiac arrest.

A 30-year review of in-hospital cardiac arrests found that the initial 70% survival to discharge rate post CPR has never been repeated since, despite the introduction of cardiac arrest teams. The clinical effectiveness of cardiac arrest teams has become questionable. An acute hospital requires a Medical Emergency team (MET) that provides early intervention, timely management and appropriate treatment to all hospital emergencies, where any staff member can summon the MET to any hospital emergency, at any time of the day. Nursing clinicians can become "physiological police", and activate the Medical Emergency Team when a patient’s vital signs breach the calling criteria.

Broad Research Areas: Health Services Research; Clinical Research; Sports Injury Research

Specific Research Keywords: Emergency Response Systems; Emergency Medicine; Resuscitation; Traumatic Brain Injury; Sports Medicine

Further information: http://www.researcherid.com/rid/B-5977-2011 

Location

http://www.aihi.unsw.edu.au/
http://simpsoncentre.med.unsw.edu.au/


 

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Contact

+612 9385 9942
+612 9385 8692