Researcher

Dr Gila Moalem-Taylor

Field of Research (FoR)

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Biography

Research Interests:
Damage to the nervous system is often associated with chronic neuropathic pain symptoms including spontaneous pain, increased sensitivity to painful stimuli (hyperalgesia), and pain perceived in response to normally non-painful stimuli (allodynia). Such pain is extremely debilitating and difficult to treat. My current research focuses on the mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain, with particular emphasis on how immune cells...view more

Research Interests:
Damage to the nervous system is often associated with chronic neuropathic pain symptoms including spontaneous pain, increased sensitivity to painful stimuli (hyperalgesia), and pain perceived in response to normally non-painful stimuli (allodynia). Such pain is extremely debilitating and difficult to treat. My current research focuses on the mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain, with particular emphasis on how immune cells and inflammatory mediators influence chronic pain following peripheral nerve injury or autoimmune inflammation in the nervous system.

Broad Research Areas:
Pain, Neuroscience, Inflammation

Qualifications:
PhD

Society Memberships & Professional Activities:
Member of the Australian Neuroscience Society, Member of the Australian Pain Society, Member of the International Association for the Study of Pain, Member of the International Society of Neuroimmunology

Specific Research Keywords:
Pain Research, Nerve Injury Pain, T Cells


My Expertise

Mechanisms underlying chronic neuropathic pain symptoms including spontaneous pain, increased sensitivity to painful stimuli (hyperalgesia), and pain perceived in response to normally non-painful stimuli (allodynia). How immune cells and inflammatory mediators influence chronic pain following peripheral nerve injury or autoimmune inflammation in the nervous system.

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Location

School of Medical Sciences, Translational Neuroscience Facility, Wallace Wurth Building, Level 3

Contact

+61 2 9385 2478
+61 2 9385 0023

Research Activities