Researcher

Miss Ebony Lewis

Biography

Ebony Lewis has come from a background of Emergency nursing with a passion for improving the end-of-life experience for older people with advanced chronic illness. She has extensive experience in geriatrics assessment and gerontology research. 
Ebony has been working at UNSW since 2015. She is currently working in research and teaching in the School of Public Health and Community Medicine at UNSW.  Ebony was previously working at the South...view more
Ebony Lewis has come from a background of Emergency nursing with a passion for improving the end-of-life experience for older people with advanced chronic illness. She has extensive experience in geriatrics assessment and gerontology research. 
Ebony has been working at UNSW since 2015. She is currently working in research and teaching in the School of Public Health and Community Medicine at UNSW.  Ebony was previously working at the South Western Sydney Clinical School, UNSW as a Research Nurse under the supervision of Associate Professor Magnolia Cardona on the CriSTAL Project. See CriSTAL project page at https://research.unsw.edu.au/projects/validation-cristal-criteria-screening-and-triaging-appropriate-alternative-care .
Ebony's research initiatives include:  the retrospective validation of clinical records from a major teaching hospital in Sydney post Medical Emergency Team (MET) calls; the conduct of the prospective validation of the CriSTAL checklist in Emergency Departments;  Leading a systematic review on effectiveness of Advance Care Directives on end-of-life communications;  a population survey of end-of-life care preferences by the elderly; and recently completed a large multi-centre cohort study of elderly patients in Australia using four frailty scales to predict outcomes at hospital discharge and at 3-months. Ebony is currently contributing to projects on prognostic preferences in hospitals, identification of elders at risk in in residential aged care, and optimising Advance Care Planning in general practice. 
Publications:
1. E. T. Lewis, R Harrison, L Hanly, et al. (2019). End-of-life priorities of older adults with terminal illness and caregivers: a qualitative consultation. Health Expectations. DOI:10.1111/hex.12860

2. Cardona M, Lewis E, Shanmugam S, Nicholson M, Williamson M, Hanly L, Hillman K. (2019). Dissonance on perceptions of end-of-life needs between healthcare providers and members of the public: quantitative cross-sectional surveys. Australasian Journal on Ageing 2019; 00:1–10. https://doi.org/10.1111/ajag.12630

3. E.T. Lewis, E Dent, H Alkhouri., et al. (2019). Which frailty scale for patients admitted via Emergency Department? A cohort study. Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics. DOI: 10.1016/j.archger.2018.11.002

4. Cardona M, Lewis E, Shanmugam S, et al. (2019). Dissonance on perceptions of end-of-life needs between health-care providers and members of the public: Quantitative cross-sectional surveys. Australas J Ageing. DOI: 10.1111/ajag.12630

5. Trankle S, Shanmugam S, Lewis E, et al. (2018). Are We Making Progress on Communication with People Who Are Near the End of Life in the Australian Health System? A Thematic Analysis. Health Communication. DOI: 10.1080/10410236.2018.1548335
6. Cardona M, Lewis ET, Turner R, et al. (2018). Efficacy of a tool to predict short-term mortality in older people presenting at emergency departments: Protocol for a multi-centre cohort study. Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics 76: 169-174.
7. Cardona-Morrell M, Lewis ET,  Kristensen MR et al. (2018). Predictive validity of the CriSTAL tool for short-term mortality in older people presenting at Emergency Departments: a prospective study. European Geriatric Medicine. DOI: 10.1007%2Fs41999-018-0123-6
8. Cardona M, Kellet, J, Lewis ET, Brabrand M, Ni Chroinin D. (2018). Truth disclosure on prognosis: is it ethical not to communicate personalized risk of death? The International Journal of Clinical Practice. DOI: 10.1111/ijcp.13222 
9. Cardona M, O’Sullivan M, Lewis ET, et al. (2018). Prospective Validation of a Checklist to Predict Short-term Death in Older Patients After Emergency Department Admission in Australia and Ireland. Academic Emergency Medicine. DOI: 10.1111/acem.13664
10. Cardona, Magnolia, Robin M. Turner, Amanda Chapman, Hatem Alkhouri, Ebony T. Lewis, Stephen Jan, Margaret Nicholson, Michael Parr, Margaret Williamson, and Ken Hillman. (2018). Who benefits from aggressive rapid response system treatments near the end of life? A retrospective cohort study. The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.44(9),505-513
11. Lewis E, Kristensen MR, O’Sullivan M, Ekmann AA, Skjøt-Arkil H, Nygaard HH, Cardona- Morrell M. (2017). Challenges of measuring frailty in emergency departments and proposed solutions. Innovation in Aging, 1(suppl_1), 383-383. 2017
12. Lewis E, Samperi S, Boyd-Skinner C. (2017). Telephone follow-up calls for older patients after hospital discharge. Age and Ageing 2017 1-3. doi: 10.1093/ageing/afw251
13. Cardona-Morrell M, Lewis E, Suman S, et al. (2017). Recognising older frail patients near the end of life: What next? European Journal of Internal Medicine. doi.org/10.1016/j.ejim.2017.09.026.

14. Lewis E, Cardona-Morrell M, Ong KY, Trankle S, Hillman K. (2016). Evidence still insufficient for advance care documentation leading to timely engagement of healthcare professionals in end-of- life discussions: A systematic review. Journal of Palliative Medicine. DOI: 10.1177/0269216316637239

15. Cardona-Morell M, Chapman A, Turner RM, Lewis E, Gallego-Luxan B, Parr M, Hillman K. (2016). Pre-existing risk factors for in-hospital death among older patients could be used to initiate end- of-life discussions rather than rapid response system calls: a case-controlled study. Resuscitation.109,76-80. 

 

CONFERENCE PAPERS
1. Lewis E, Cardona-Morrell M, Alkhouri H, Hillman K Self-rated health as a proxy for frailty in older adults at emergency departments. Global Acute Care Excellence Forum, February, 2017. Poster. Brisbane
2. Cardona-Morrell M, Lewis E, Nicholson M, Hanly, L, Chapman A, Kim J, Trankle S, Turner R, Ong K, Shanmugan S, Alkhouri H, Asha S, Perkins M, Holdgate A, Suri S, Winoto L, Harrison R, BenfattiOlivato G, Zammit A, Hillman K. Challenges of research on sensitive topics: The end-of-life experience. Ingham Research & Innovation Showcase, October, 2016
3. Cardona-Morrell M, Lewis E, Hillman K. Identifying and managing the frail elderly: to prevent nonbeneficial interventions. Sydney Institute of Palliative Medicine, September, 2016, Sydney
4. Cardona-Morrell M, Lewis E, Nicholson M, Alkhouri H, McCarthy S, Hanly L, Samperi S, Ashton A, Shantiban S, Trankle S, Hillman K. Recruiting the hard-to-reach groups for research in real-life settings: The CriSTAL Program. Emergency Care Institute Annual Symposium. Poster, Sydney, Nov 2015
5. Cardona-Morrell M, Chapman M, Werner M, Turner RM, Lewis E, Parr M, Hillman K. Retrospective Validation of THE CriSTAL checklist to predict in-hospital death for patients requiring a RRS call. Preliminary results. International Rapid Response Systems Conference. Oral poster, Amsterdam, May 2015
6. Cardona-Morrell M, Lewis E, Hanly L, Samperi S, Ashton A, Land K, Alkhouri H, McCarthy S, Asha S, McKenzie J, Holdgate A, Perkins M, Suri S, Winoto L, Brabrand M, Breen D, Kellett J, O’Sullivan O, Turner, R Gallego B, Hillman K. Update on CriSTAL: Multi-centre Prospective validation of a predictive checklist. Emergency Care Institute Annual Symposium. Poster, Sydney, Nov 2015
7. Cardona-Morrell M, Lewis E, Nicholson M, Shanmugam S, Hanly L, Hillman K. Public and clinician’s readiness to discuss end of life: moving from knowledge to action. Ingham Institute Research Showcase. Oral presentation, Sydney, Nov 2015
8. Cardona-Morrell, M., Chapman, A., Werner, M., Lewis, E., Parr, M & Hillman, K. (2015). Retrospective Validation of the CriSTAL checklist to predict in-hospital death for patients requiring a Rapid Response call. MET Conference Amsterdam, May 2015

 

 


My Awards

1. Winner, Paper of the Year Award 2016
https://eapcnet.wordpress.com/2017/08/23/palliative-medicine-paper-of-the-year-award-helping-clinicians-engage-in-end-of-life-discussions-with-older-dying-patients/ 

2. Finalist, NSW Health Statewide Awards for Innovation in Research
CriSTAL clinical prediction tool to encourage advance care planning. New South Wales Health Ministry (October 2017)

3. Winner. Quality Award for Patient Safety, September 2017
South Western Sydney Local Health District for program of work on Criteria for Screening and Triaging to Appropriate aLternative care (CriSTAL)

 


My Research Supervision


Supervision keywords


Areas of supervision

ILP, Masters

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Contact

ebony.lewis@unsw.edu.au

Research Activities

This online survey of nurses and doctors dealing with elderley people approaching the end of their lives has the following objectives:
•  To assess the level of exposure to and confidence in initiating end-of-life conversations
• To identify barriers for initiating the sensitive end-of-life conversation
• To identify factors influencing the level of confidence in facing end-of-life discussions
• To propose strategies for addressing these barriers in line with the training needs and wants of the target group

The survey  is  a unique opportunity…

Diagnosing dying is relatively straightforward when symptoms are evident within the last few days or hours of death. Diagnosing the dying several months or weeks before the final event is more complex and doctors generally feel uncertain about prognosis.  Failure to recognise chronically ill elderly  patients  who are naturally and normally dying delays appropriate decision-making on limitations of treatment,  and the planning of comfort care. This leads to intensive treatments to prolong life and even to resuscitation attempts, which can cause more harm than good.…

SURVEY OF OLDER PEOPLE ON END-OF-LIFE PERCEPTIONS AND PREFERENCES

The Public consultation with older consumers commenced in 2015 with a survey of members of the public aged 60 years and over, to understand their perceptions of end-of-life, care preferences, preferred place of death and attitides towards doctors predicting risk of death.

The goal was to identify current perceptions and potential points for interventions.

Objectives

a)      To characterise public perception of…