Researcher

Dr Kim Van Schooten

Keywords

Biography

Kim van Schooten is a postdoctoral fellow at NeuRA and conjoint senior lecturer at UNSW Medicine supported by the Human Frontier Science Program. She obtained her Ph.D. in 2014 from the faculty of Human Movement Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (the Netherlands). She was a Mitacs & Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research postdoctoral fellow at the faculty of Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology, Simon Fraser University and the...view more

Kim van Schooten is a postdoctoral fellow at NeuRA and conjoint senior lecturer at UNSW Medicine supported by the Human Frontier Science Program. She obtained her Ph.D. in 2014 from the faculty of Human Movement Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (the Netherlands). She was a Mitacs & Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research postdoctoral fellow at the faculty of Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology, Simon Fraser University and the Centre for Hip Health and Mobility, University of British Columbia (Canada). Her research focuses on balance control and fall risk in seniors. She is particularly interested in the underlying mechanisms of balance impairments, and methodologies for ambulatory monitoring of mobility using wearable sensors. Through a combination of experimental and epidemiological studies, she studies how people maintain and recover balance during daily-life activities, to improve our understanding of why falls occur and to reveal targets for the prevention of mobility impairments and falls.


My Research Activities


My Research Supervision


Supervision keywords


Areas of supervision

My research focuses on balance control and fall risk in older people. A few examples of topics of interest are:

  • The effect of physical exercise on balance and fall risk in older people
  • Understanding the relationship between cognitive decline and balance recovery
  • The effect of depression and fear of falling on daily activity
  • Gender inequality in physical activity and exercise adherence
  • Development of novel wearable technologies to detect falls and fall risk

Currently supervising

  • Understanding the relationship between health literacy and fear of falling in older people
  • The effect of an online cognitive behavioural therapy program on fear of falling in older people
  • Towards tailored fall prevention: identifying modifiable fall risk factors in older people
  • The sensitivity to change of daily-life gait quality characteristics in older people
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