Researcher

Professor Andrew Lloyd

My Expertise

Infectious diseases and immunology.

Field of Research (FoR)

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Biography

Professor Andrew Lloyd is an infectious diseases physician, and an epidemiology, virology and immunology researcher. He is an NHMRC Practitioner Fellow. He is the Head of the Viral Immunology Systems Program (VISP) in the Kirby Institute, the National Centre for Cancer Survivorship (NCCS) and the UNSW Fatigue Clinic at the University of NSW. He also provides clinical services in infectious diseases at Prince of Wales Hospital, and hepatology...view more

Professor Andrew Lloyd is an infectious diseases physician, and an epidemiology, virology and immunology researcher. He is an NHMRC Practitioner Fellow. He is the Head of the Viral Immunology Systems Program (VISP) in the Kirby Institute, the National Centre for Cancer Survivorship (NCCS) and the UNSW Fatigue Clinic at the University of NSW. He also provides clinical services in infectious diseases at Prince of Wales Hospital, and hepatology services to Justice Health in the NSW prisons. His research program has been continuously funded by NHMRC since 1993.

Research Interests:
The goal of the research groups which are led by Professor Lloyd is to understand the cellular and molecular basis of host responses in human infectious diseases. In particular, the groups are focussed on studies of the pathogenesis of hepatitis C infection, and the characteristics of the host response to other infections including Epstein-Barr virus, Ross River virus and Coxiella burnetii - the causative agent of Q fever.

The scope of the research extends from laboratory studies of the basic biology of genes relevant to disease pathogenesis through to clinical and epidemiological studies in humans, including in prospective cohort studies and clinical trials. The laboratory-based research includes next generation sequencing of viruses, as well as cellular and molecular immunology techniques, including multi-colour flow cytometry, neutralisation assays, enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISpot) and mutliplex cytokine detection assays. In addition, the research includes in vitro studies in cell culture systems as well as tissue-based studies in human samples and in animal models of disease.

Broad Research Areas:
Immunology, Virology, Infectious Diseases, Inflammation, Pathology

Qualifications:
MB BS Syd, MD UNSW, FRACP

Society Memberships & Professional Activities:
American Association of Immunologists; Australasian Society for Infectious Diseases; Australasian Society for Immunology; Australasian Society for HIV Medicine; Australian Centre for Hepatitis Virology

Specific Research Keywords:
Hepatitis C, Anti-viral immunity, T cells, B Cells, Cytokines, Chemokines, Post-infective fatigue states


My Awards

Member, Order of Australia (A.M): “For service to medicine and the community, particularly through provision of hepatitis services in prisons, and research in infectious diseases”.


My Research Activities

The focus of the VISP us studies of the epidemiology, immunopathogenesis and treatment of hepatitis C (HCV) infection, including in: the HITS-p cohort (Hepatitis C Incidence and Transmission Study in prisons) which has been funded for over a decade by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC); and in the Australian Trials in Acute Hepatitis C (ATAHC-I and ATAHC-II) funded by NIH, USA. He is the principal investigator on an Australian NHMRC Program grant entitled “Hepatitis C infection: epidemiology, pathogenesis, and treatment” studying clinical and laboratory (immunovirology) aspects of hepatitis C infection.His laboratory-based research program is using clinical data and blood samples from the HCV cohorts to study the role of virus neutralizing antibodies and HCV-specific cellular immunity in the context of early acute mono-infection and in mixed infection cases under the auspices of the NHMRC Program Grant. He also leads a health services research program, which has led to the development and evaluation of an innovative nurse-led model of hepatitis care in the New South Wales (NSW) prisons, which has now been rolled out across the state. This project also led to establishment of a similar nurse-led, GP supported, telemedicine-based model of hepatitis C assessment and treatment in nine rural and remote regions in five states across the country – the Liver Outreach Australia (LORA) program – currently being evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively. He also co-leads the Surveillance and Treatment of hepatitis C in prisoners (SToP-C) project, which is funded by a NHMRC Partnership grant with NSW Health, Justice Health, Corrective services and Gilead Sciences; and the Study of Hepatitis C Treatment and Reinfection in People who inject drugs in the prisons and in the community (SHARP-p and SHARP-c) which is a prospective cohort study examining incidence and predictors of hepatitis C reinfection.

He also leads a research program studying determinants of the severity and course of fatigue states after common acute infections, and after successful cancer treatment. With support from NMHRC and the Centers for Disease Control, USA, he led the establishment of the Dubbo Infection Outcomes Study (DIOS), which confirmed the link between chronic fatigue states and several acute infectious diseases, defined the natural history, and demonstrated that demographic and psychological variables did not predict the prolonged illness. He similarly co-led the Folcan study, funded by the Komen Foundation USA  – a prospective cohort of breast cancer survivors followed from early stage cancer diagnosis through adjuvant treatment over five years examining post-cancer fatigue states. He has conducted multiple nested case-control studies examining genetic and immunological hypotheses of pathogenesis with data and samples collected in these cohorts. He now leads a new prospective cohort study – the Sydney Infection Outcomes Study (SIOS), which is investigating genetic and neurophysiological determinants of the characteristics of the acute infective illness and post-infective fatigue states. He has recently completed the Cancer Australia-funded Treatment of Post-cancer fatigue Study (TOPS) trial, which demonstrated the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioural therapy and graded exercise therapy in the management of post-cancer fatigue. In the UNSW Fatigue Clinic he leads a multi-disciplinary research team conducting both pathophysiological research to better understand disease menchanims in medicallyt-unexplained fatigue states, and also clinical research to improve existing cognitive-behavioural therapoy (CBT) and graded exericse therapy (GET) treatment interventions.

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Contact

+61 (2) 9385 2534