Researcher

Associate Professor Daniel Sai-Ping Chan

Field of Research (FoR)

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Biography

INTRODUCTION

A/Prof. Daniel Chan is an associate professor and Head of the Department of Pure Mathematics.

 

RESEARCH INTERESTS

He works in the area of non-commutative algebraic geometry, an exciting new field where sophisticated techniques from algebraic geometry have been imported to study non-commutative algebras. Much of his work has focussed on studying orders on projective surfaces which can be studied via a non-commutative adaptation of...view more

INTRODUCTION

A/Prof. Daniel Chan is an associate professor and Head of the Department of Pure Mathematics.

 

RESEARCH INTERESTS

He works in the area of non-commutative algebraic geometry, an exciting new field where sophisticated techniques from algebraic geometry have been imported to study non-commutative algebras. Much of his work has focussed on studying orders on projective surfaces which can be studied via a non-commutative adaptation of Mori's minimal model program. Other interests include finite dimensional algebras, non-commutative surfaces, moduli spaces in non-commutative algebra, the McKay correspondence and non-commutative rings arising from projective geometry such as the twisted homogeneous co-ordinate ring.

He is part of the Geometry group and the Algebra and Number Theory group.

 

ADMINISTRATIVE DUTIES

He is also an associate editor for the Journal of the Australian Mathematical Society. 

 


My Expertise

Non-commutative algebraic geometry, non-commutative surfaces, moduli spaces in non-commutative algebra, the McKay correspondence and non-commutative rings arising from projective geometry.

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Location

School of Mathematics and Statistics
University of New South Wales
Sydney NSW 2052
The Red Centre
Room 4104

Contact

9385 7084
9385 7123

Publications

by Associate Professor Daniel Sai-Ping Chan

Research Activities

Non-commutative algebra is a rich, classical subject, ubiquitous in mathematics, since non-commutative algebras arise whenever you have linear operators such as differentiation or rotation.