Researcher

Dr Tzipi Cohen-Hyams

Biography

Tzipi completed her PhD in Materials Sci. and Eng. at the Technion, Israel. She then continued with postdoctoral research at UC Berkeley (Fulbright Fellowship) specialising in in-situ Raman spectroscopy. After finishing the postdoc fellowship, she was appointed as a staff scientist at the Nanotechnology Research and Development Institute in Israel. During her studies and work experience Tzipi has gained many years of experience in advanced...view more

Tzipi completed her PhD in Materials Sci. and Eng. at the Technion, Israel. She then continued with postdoctoral research at UC Berkeley (Fulbright Fellowship) specialising in in-situ Raman spectroscopy. After finishing the postdoc fellowship, she was appointed as a staff scientist at the Nanotechnology Research and Development Institute in Israel. During her studies and work experience Tzipi has gained many years of experience in advanced microstructural characterisation, including FIB expertise with nanopatterning and failure analysis processes. She also gained extensive TEM sample preparation experience in areas including chemical analysis.
In 2016, Tzipi joined the Ingham Institute for Medical Research in Liverpool as the correlative microscopy facility (CMF). Tzipi manages and operates high-end microscopes such as the newly acquired Carl Zeiss GeminiSEM 300 FESEM and the Airyscan 800, a superresolution laser scanning microscope (SRLSM). The CMF develops and optimises imaging protocols and research applications, guide, train and support graduate and undergraduate students and researchers users while conducting research in partnership with different groups from the Ingham Institute and from southwest Sydney.


My Research Activities

As a member of the Correlative Microscopy Group, we combine nanotechnology with advanced microscopy to study cell pathology mechanisms in renal disease, retinal disease and cancer. We are developing correlative microscopy techniques based on cryogenic fixation, newly developed fluorescent dyes and nanoparticle probes to identify key structures in cells and their surrounding matrix. Our aim is to extract maximum information from a single routine pathology specimen. We seek to identify individual effector cells with certainty, learn how they function and understand how they contribute to the disease process. Whether they are activated or senescent, signalling or communicating with neighbouring cells or if they are mobile and invasive or dying due to treatment.


My Research Supervision


Supervision keywords


Areas of supervision

Ingham Institute Correlative Microscopy Facility-Subjects

  • Ageing and degeneration of the human retina
  • Hypoxia and cell starvation: in-vitro modelling of surgical procedures
  • Microbiome effects on colon carcinoma
  • Characterisation of rare circulating tumour cells by correlative microscopy
  • Netosis in blood clot thrombosis formation leading to stroke
  • 3-D imaging of cancer cell ultrastructure using array tomography and serial block face imaging
  • Time-lapse imaging analysis of rare cancer cell events with characterisation by correlative microscopy
  • New method development in cryogenic nanoparticle-based correlative immunocytochemistry for application in cancer cell biology and small biopsy pathology
  • 3-D imaging of mitochondrial changes in disease
  • Exosome signalling from epithelia
  • Prostate cancer angiogenesis as a predictor of poor clinical outcome
     
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Location

Ingham Institute

Contact

0287389104