Researcher

Dr Srinjoy Bose

My Expertise

I research and consult on topics at the intersection of International Relations, Critical Peace & Security, and International Development, with a focus on political order and violence, political development, statebuilding and peacebuilding.

Areas of expertise:

  • Intervention
  • Political Order & Political Violence
  • State (Trans)Formation
  • 'Fragile' States
  • International Aid & Development
  • Statebuilding & Post-Conflict Reconstruction
  • Legitimacy in Statebuilding
  • Peacebuilding
  • Rebel Governance
  • Democratisation
  • Protracted Conflicts
  • Conflict Transformation
  • Informal & Non-State Security Actors
  • Peace Processes & Political Settlements
  • Insurgency & Counter-Insurgency (COIN)
  • Afghanistan, South-West & Central Asia, MENA countries

Keywords

Fields of Research (FoR)

International relations, Peace studies, Humanitarian disasters, conflict and peacebuilding, Political economy and social change, Government and politics of Asia and the Pacific

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Biography

I am Senior Lecturer in Politics and International Relations, and I research topics in critical peace/security studies including, political order and violence, international intervention, state formation, conflict transition, democratisation, warlord/insurgent/rebel governance, and the political economy of statebuilding and peacebuilding in 'fragile' and deeply divided states and societies. For a detailed list of current (and completed)...view more
I am Senior Lecturer in Politics and International Relations, and I research topics in critical peace/security studies including, political order and violence, international intervention, state formation, conflict transition, democratisation, warlord/insurgent/rebel governance, and the political economy of statebuilding and peacebuilding in 'fragile' and deeply divided states and societies. For a detailed list of current (and completed) projects, see my Researcher bio: https://research.unsw.edu.au/people/dr-srinjoy-bose. 
 
In May 2018 I joined the School of Social Sciences, UNSW. Previously, I was Marie Sklodowska-Curie Fellow at the School of Government and International Affairs, Durham University. Prior to that, from 2011 to 2016, I was Prime Minister's Australia-Asia Endeavour Postgraduate Award scholar at The Australian National University, where I earned my PhD in Politics and International Relations. I also consult as a geopolitics, security, and NGO analyst. In my different professional capacities, I work with public-sector experts, government officials, diplomats, UN/World Bank and INGO representatives, activists, and even armed groups.
 
I am co-Editor of Drones and Global Order: The Implications of Remote Warfare for International Society (London: Routledge, forthcoming), Hybridity in Peacebuilding and Development: a Critical and Reflexive Approach (London: Routledge, 2019), Hybridity on the Ground in Peacebuilding and Development: Critical Conversations (Canberra: The ANU Press, 2018), Afghanistan - Challenges and Prospects (London: Routledge, 2017), 'Critical Hybridity in Peacebuilding and Development' (Third World Thematics: a TWQ Journal 2:4, 2017/2018), and 'Elections and the State: Critical Perspectives on Democracy Promotion in Afghanistan' (Conflict, Security and Development 16:6, 2016). In addition, I have published in several leading peer-reviewed journals including Global Responsibility to Protect, Conflict, Security and Development, Journal of Peacebuilding & Development, India Review, and Australian Journal of International Affairs. I also serve on the Editorial Board of the journal Global Policy.

My Grants

  • Faculty of Arts, Design and Architecture (UNSW, Sydney) Research Grant: 2021; A$10,000
  • School of Social Science (UNSW, Sydney) Strategic Priority Funding Research Grant: 2021; A$4,000
  • School of Social Science (UNSW, Sydney) Strategic Priority Funding Research Grant: 2020; A$4,000
  • Facebook Research Grant: 2018; US$50,000
  • School of Social Science (UNSW, Sydney) Strategic Priority Funding Research Grant: 2019; A$5,000
  • School of Social Science (UNSW, Sydney) Strategic Priority Funding Research Grant: 2018; A$3,000
  • European Union COFUND (Marie Sklodowska-Curie) Fellowship: 2017; £76,000
  • United States Institute of Peace (USIP) Research Grant: 2016; US$36,000
  • Coral Bell School of Asia-Pacific Affairs (ANU) Travel Grant: 2015; A$1,000
  • Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship: 2015; €6,000
  • ANU Vice-Chancellor's Travel Grant: 2013; A$1,000
  • Coral Bell School of Asia-Pacific Affairs (ANU) Fieldwork Grant: 2013; A$7,000
  • AusAID (ISSS) Workshop Grant: 2013; A$17,000
  • Research School of Asia and Pacific (ANU) Workshop Grant: 2013; A$20,000
  • Prime Minister's Australia-Asia Endeavour Postgraduate Award: 2010; A$252,000 
  • National University of Singapore Research Scholarship: 2007: S$52,000

My Qualifications

PhD (The Australian National University)
M.Sos.Sc. (National University of Singapore)
B.A. Honours, First Class (University of Otago)


My Awards

  • European Union COFUND (Marie Sklodowska-Curie) Fellowship: 2017; £76,000.
  • Prime Minister's Australia-Asia Endeavour Postgraduate Award: 2010; $252,000.
  • National University of Singapore Research Scholarship: 2007: $52,000.

 


My Research Activities

My current research agenda comprises two core (and long-term) studies: First, I am working towards publishing my first book, titled The Legitimacy Puzzle: Statebuilding in Contemporary Afghanistan. The book explores the sources of state legitimacy and impact of legitimation strategies on statebuilding in Afghanistan, and represents a comprehensive and original attempt to place Afghanistan’s post-2001 statebuilding project within an easily accessible political-sociology framework. It also explores the extent to which the internationally-assisted statebuilding project was misconceived, overlooking the critical importance of connecting international and local legitimacy principles through the newly designed institutions and structures in which the authority of state was vested. Concurrently, I have developed a follow-on study - titled, Democracy Promotion and State-Formation in Limited Access Orders: a Political Economy Study of Elections in Afghanistan - that adds to critiques of the rise of democracy promotion, and employs political economy analyses to understand the more focused research on the perverse effects of elections in Afghanistan. This study de-constructs and denaturalises the idea of the Weberian state, blurring the binary distinctions between state and non-state, legitimate and illegitimate and highlight the networks, coalitions, and material foundations that underpin or undermine the state. The thinking is, if political transitions are primarily about the restoration (or creation) of legitimate political authority, this suggests a need to focus attention on the ‘vernacular’ of local politics.

In addition to the above, I am working on several secondary, and shorter-term studies and projects. Below is a list of working and completed projects:

Working/Ongoing Projects:

  • 'Sustainable Peace and Peaceful Sustainability in Conflict-Affected Societies: Nepal and Afghanistan'. 2020-2022. By investigating the variables linking positive peace and environmental sustainability (and establish their relationship), this project examines local manifestations of the positive peace-environmental sustainability nexus. In so doing, the project aims to integrate positive peace indicators and environmental sustainability indicators into an online and publicly accessible database, and influence research, policies, and initiatives on positive peace and environmental sustainability. Collaborative project. Co-Investigator and Afghanistan case-study Theme Leader (Principal Investigator Dr Dahlia Simangan, Hiroshima University).
  • ‘Democracy Promotion and State-Formation in Limited Access Orders: a Political Economy Study of Elections in Afghanistan’. 2017-2019. Examining how illiberal institutions may contribute to state-formation in post-conflict societies. The study employs a political economy framework of analysis to interrogate democracy promotion and election practices in Afghanistan. Individual project. Principal Investigator.
  • ‘Misinformation in Diverse Societies, Political Behaviour and Good Governance’. Long-term project. Utilizing a field experiment with WhatsApp and multi-wave survey experiments on the ground in India and Afghanistan, this study aims to establish causal relationship between misinformation spread through social networks and ethnic violence, public opinion on ethnic relations, and public policy choices. Collaborative project. Co-Investigator (Principal Investigator Prof. Robert Johns, Essex University).
  • ‘Legitimacy in Afghanistan: Keeping the State at Bay’. 2017-2018. Article based on PhD dissertation. Examining tensions in statebuilding between local and international interests and practices. The study demonstrates that Afghanistan’s social order curbed and blunted the ambitions of political power, and made it extraordinarily resistant to political moulding. Individual project. Principal Investigator. Manuscript to be submitted with Journal of Peace Research [Impact Factor: 3.164; H-Index: 76].
  • ‘Dispersion of Coercive Power in Afghanistan: Structural Legitimacy and State Legitimation’. 2017-2018. Article based on PhD dissertation. Examining how cooperation between international, state, and non-state actors to provide security have resulted in the embedding of violent or illegitimate institutions and forms of order in the machinery of the (Afghan) state. Individual project. Principal Investigator. Manuscript to be submitted with International Peacekeeping [Impact Factor: 1.063; H-Index: 15].
  • ‘Elite Redux: Elite Settlements and the Perpetuation of Power’. 2018. Article. Examining the international practice of basing conflict resolution efforts in fragile societies on the concept of ‘political settlements’. The study problematizes political settlements in the context of the statebuilding paradigm as the prevailing exit pathway from fragility, and finds that often the procedural focus on elections as pathway out of conflict tends to legitimize the status quo, and in the process perpetuating the dominance of powerful elites that were often at the root of the conflict. Collaborative project. Co-Investigator with Prof. Sukanya Podder (King’s College London, UK) and Erwin Van Veen (Clingendael Institute, Netherlands). Manuscript to be submitted with International Affairs [Impact Factor: 1.478; H-Index: 58].
  • ‘The Economic Origins of Warlord Support for Peace: a Comparative Study of Mexcio and Afghanistan’. Article. Articulating a political-economic theory to explain the conditions and processes by which warlords prefer to make peace. The theory is evaluated by a very different comparative research design using studies of post-revolutionary Mexico (1910-1929) and contemporary Afghanistan (2001-2018). The findings, based on archival and secondary evidence from the US, Mexico, and Afghanistan, support the intuitive theory that warlords prefer peace agreements when the costs of retaining power become unacceptable and their financial backers provide incentives. Collaborative project; Co-Investigator with Dr Vasabjit Banerjee (Mississippi State University). Manuscript to be submitted with Journal of Peace Research (H-Index: 81; Impact Factor: 3.888).

Completed Projects:

  • ‘Structures of Opportunity and Patterns of Youth Activism in Afghanistan’. 2017-2018. Special Report for USIP. Examined emerging patterns of youth activism in Afghanistan and its implications for the future. For several decades scholars of social movements have been studying the relationship between political context, socio-economic conditions, and rise and evolution of social and political movements. In this study we designed and articulated a structures of opportunity framework to investigate how Afghanistan’s youth interpret, perceive, and respond to the opportunities made available to them by the country’s formal and informal political structures. Collaborative project. Principal Investigator. Manuscript published as United States Institute of Peace (USIP) Special Report. 2019.
  • ‘Critical Hybridity: History, Power, and Scale’. 2016-2017. Examined how the concept of ‘hybridity’ changes as it travels between disciplines and contexts. Collaborative project. Co-investigator with Joanne Wallis (ANU), Lia Kent (ANU), Miranda Forsyth (ANU), and Sinclair Dinnen (ANU). Guest Editor, journal special issue. Third World Thematics: a TWQ Journal 2(5), 2017. [Impact Factor: 1.156; H-Index: 61] Also published as Lia Kent, Miranda Forsyth, Joanne Wallis, Sinclair Dinnen, and Srinjoy Bose, Hybridity in Peacebuilding and Development: a Critical and Reflexive Approach. London: Routledge, 2018.
  • Hybridity on the Ground in Peacebuilding and Development: Critical Conversations. 2016-2017. Examined the potential contribution of the concept of ‘hybridity’ to improving understanding of pluralism and change in socially complex societies. Collaborative project. Co-investigator with Joanne Wallis (ANU), Lia Kent (ANU), Miranda Forsyth (ANU), and Sinclair Dinnen (ANU). Co-Editor, edited volume. Canberra: ANU Press, 2018.
  • ‘Elections and the State: Critical Perspectives on Democracy Promotion in Afghanistan’. 2014-2015. Political economy analysis of democracy promotion and elections in disrupted and transitioning states. Collaborative project. Principal investigators Professor Jonathan Goodhand (School of Oriental and African Studies) and Dr Astri Suhrke (Chr. Michelson Institute). Guest Editor, journal special issue. Conflict, Security and Development 16(6), 2016. [Impact Factor: 0.806; H-Index: 12]
  • Afghanistan—Challenges and Prospects. 2013-2015. Examined the ongoing political and military transitions in Afghanistan. Collaborative project. Principal investigator. Co-Editor, edited volume. London: Routledge, 2017.
  • ‘Death by a Thousand Cuts or Dance of the Seven Veils? Legitimacy and Generation of Authority in Afghanistan’s Statebuilding Enterprise, 2001—2014’. 2011-2016. Examined the role of Legitimacy in promoting the internationalised statebuilding project in Afghanistan. Individual project (PhD). PhD was nominated for the 2017 ANU J.G. Crawford Prize for outstanding contribution to scholarship.

My Research Supervision


Supervision keywords


Areas of supervision

I supervise Honours, Masters, and HDR (PhD) projects at the intersection of International Relations, International Development, and Critical Peace / Security. Some topics that I enjoy supervising (and am especially well-placed to supervise) include:

  • Intervention
  • Protracted Conflicts
  • Political Order & Political Violence
  • State Formation
  • 'Fragile' States
  • International Aid & Development
  • Statebuilding & Post-Conflict Reconstruction
  • Legitimacy in Statebuilding
  • Peacebuilding
  • Good Governance
  • Democratization
  • Conflict (war-to-peace) Transition / Conflict Transformation
  • Non-State Security Actors, & Pro-Government Militias
  • Peace Processes & Political Settlements
  • Insurgency & COIN
  • Elections in Protracted Conflicts
  • Afghanistan, Pakistan, South-West & Central Asia, MENA countries

Previous topics I have supervised to completion at the Masters and Honours levels at UNSW include:

Postgraduate (M.A.)

  • Ms Bethany Castle (Historical Sociology, Biopolitics, and CTS: an Examination of Morally Illegitimate Forms of Warfare)
  • Mr Nicolas Johnston (Violence, Power and Meaning: The Moral Logic of Terrorism)
  • Mr Obaidullah Baheer (A Study of the Structural and Ideational Factors Hindering Negotiations with the Taliban)

Honours (B.A., Hons.)

  • Mr Maxim Mancino (Land Rights for Who? Deconstructing Attitudes and Preferences in Peacebuilding Discourse, a Case Study of Timor Leste)

Currently supervising

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), UNSW

  • Ms Maine Suadik (The Politics of Access: Food Security in Sabah's Indigenous Communities)
  • Mr Samuel Pascoe (The Great War of Ideas: a Review into National Security Communications)
  • Mr Christopher Khatouki (State Violence in East Asian Developmental Regimes)
  • Mr Ammar Albualikhan (The Rising Effect of Theocracies in Light of Global Inequality: an Analytical Study of Shia Political Performance in the Middle East)

Postgraduate (M.A.), UNSW

  • Mr Akhil Suresh (Decolonisation and State Development)

Honours (B.A., Hons.), UNSW

  • Ms Anoushka Anupindi (‘Voluntourism’ Industry's Effects on International Development)

My Engagement

Professional memberships:

  • International Studies Association (ISA)
  • European International Studies Association (EISA)
  • British International Studies Association (BISA) and BISA Peacekeeping & Peacebuilding Associate Working Group
  • Asian Studies Association of Australia (ASAA)
  • South Asian Studies Association of Australia (SASAA)

Other affiliations:

  • Institute Associate. Australian Human Rights Institute, UNSW
  • Visiting Research Fellow. Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs, The Australian National University
  • Salzburg Global Fellow. Salzburg Global Seminar

Journal Editorial Board:

  • Global Policy (Wiley-Blackwell)

Reviewer for journals:

  • Third World Quarterly (Taylor & Francis)
  • Australian Journal of International Affairs (Taylor & Francis)
  • Global Policy (Wiley-Blackwell)
  • Terrorism and Political Violence (Taylor & Francis)
  • Asian Studies Review (Taylor & Francis)
  • Middle East Critique (Taylor & Francis)
  • International History Review (Taylor & Francis)

University service / UNSW committees:

  • Co-Chair, Executive Committee UNSW ECAN (Early Career Academic Network) (2021-2022)
  • Member, University Research Committee (URC) (2021)
  • Member, University Higher Degree Research Committee (UHDRC) (2021)
  • Member, School Research Committee, School of Social Sciences, (2021-2022)
  • Member, Faculty of Arts, Design and Architecture (FADA) ECAN (Early Career Academic Network) (2021-2022)
  • School Student Ethics Officer (SSEO), School of Social Sciences (2019-2021)
  • Member, Executive Committee UNSW ECAN (Early Career Academic Network) (2019-2020)
  • Deputy Chair / Secretary, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) ECAN (Early Career Academic Network) (2018-2020)

My Teaching

UNSW (School of Social Sciences) Teaching:

  • POLS5131 - 'Political Violence, Insurgency, and Terrorism' (Convener & Lecturer)
  • POLS5161 - 'Developing Countries and the International System' (Convener & Lecturer)
  • ARTS1846 - 'Politics, Peace and Prosperity' (Convener & Lecturer)
  • SRAP5101 - 'Research Methods & Design' (Lecturer)
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