Can an anti-HIV gene in blood stem cells protect from immune depletion by HIV?

Our aim is to mathematically model the impact a new cell-delivered anti-HIV gene therapy can have in
suppressing HIV and in protecting the immune system from depletion. It is significant because for the first time
a model will be generated describing...

Our aim is to mathematically model the impact a new cell-delivered anti-HIV gene therapy can have in
suppressing HIV and in protecting the immune system from depletion. It is significant because for the first time
a model will be generated describing the important steps in production of CD4+ T cells from their blood stem
cells. We will describe how this system is perturbed by HIV and the impact of the anti-HIV gene. This is of
considerable interest since an individual who had their blood stem cells replaced by stem cells lacking our anti-
HIV target was cured of HIV.Our aim is to mathematically model the impact a new cell-delivered anti-HIV gene therapy can have in
suppressing HIV and in protecting the immune system from depletion. It is significant because for the first time
a model will be generated describing the important steps in production of CD4+ T cells from their blood stem
cells. We will describe how this system is perturbed by HIV and the impact of the anti-HIV gene. This is of
considerable interest since an individual who had their blood stem cells replaced by stem cells lacking our anti-
HIV target was cured of HIV. It is innovative because the mathematical modelling will direct the associated
laboratory work, so that maximal accuracy of the model predictions can be achieved.

Project team

Professor John Murray
Faculty of Science

Key contact

Faculty of Science
9385 7042
J.Murray@unsw.edu.au