Researcher

Dr Robert Ernest Nordon

My Expertise

Cell separation; bioreactor systems for cell therapies

Field of Research (FoR)

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Biography

Dr Robert Nordon is a Senior Lecturer with the Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering. His research interests include:    
1. Medical device development: Bioreactors for manufacture of stem-cell derived products
Scaling from lab to clinic will require more efficient methods to propagate stem cells, direct differentiation and utilise expensive culture components such as cytokines and adhesion molecules. At the present time there are no...view more

Dr Robert Nordon is a Senior Lecturer with the Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering. His research interests include:    
1. Medical device development: Bioreactors for manufacture of stem-cell derived products
Scaling from lab to clinic will require more efficient methods to propagate stem cells, direct differentiation and utilise expensive culture components such as cytokines and adhesion molecules. At the present time there are no cost-effective ways of producing transfusion products from blood stem cells. We have developed a bioreactor system with micro-channel (200 micron) architecture, to support high-density growth of haematopoietic cells (1-100 million cells/ml) in a low fluid shear environment. Future work will employ microfluidic manufacturing technology to develop microbioreactors for process optimisation. This is a multidisplinary program that draws on biomedical, electrical, mechanical and chemical engineering disciplines.

2. Organ on a chip: Simulating cell microenvironments using microfluidics
Blood is formed from haemogenic endothelium lining the doral aorta shortly after the embryo's heart starts to beat. We have developed a microfluidic devices to mimic this process, and study the effect of pulstatile shear stress on blood formation from pluripotent stem cells.

3. Single cell analysis by live cell imaging and RNA seq
We utilise 2D and 3D videomicroscopy to track cell fate in vitro. We have used light sheet microscopy to track tumour killing using CAR T cells, as well as statistical methods to quantify cell fate from single cell division pedigrees. We are applying single cell RNA sequencing to study cell heterogeneity, and to understand cell development using single cell gene expression signatures.

 

 

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Location

Samuels Building
UNSW Sydney NSW 2052
Australia

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Contact

+61 2 9385 0559
+61 2 9663 2108