Associate Professor Patrick Spicer

Associate Professor Patrick Spicer

Fields of research: Soft Condensed Matter, Rheology, Colloid and Surface Chemistry, Powder and Particle Technology, Nanofabrication, Growth and Self Assembly, Food Chemistry and Molecular Gastronomy (excl. Wine)
Campus: Kensington

Postdoc Opening with the Complex Fluids Group!

Research Interests: Design and development of microstructured fluid materials by understanding their kinetic behavior. Most of our work deals with complex fluids, fluids containing small amounts of colloids, polymers, and surfactants that exhibit highly non-ideal behaviour with fascinating dynamics. Complex fluids are a key part of most major products and manufacturing processes. Our group uses advanced imaging and rheology techniques to...

Postdoc Opening with the Complex Fluids Group!

Research Interests: Design and development of microstructured fluid materials by understanding their kinetic behavior. Most of our work deals with complex fluids, fluids containing small amounts of colloids, polymers, and surfactants that exhibit highly non-ideal behaviour with fascinating dynamics. Complex fluids are a key part of most major products and manufacturing processes. Our group uses advanced imaging and rheology techniques to understand fundamental complex fluid properties, specifically:

Shape - Particle shape affects advanced material strength, reactivity, and biological uptake.

Structure - Self-assembly creates soft structures with biological, chemical, and physical applications.

Flow - Microstructured fluids are a part of most commercial products, and processes, and their flow affects stability.

Bio: Pat Spicer received a BS in Chemical Engineering from the University of Delaware in 1992. In 1997 he completed a PhD in Chemical Engineering with the Particle Technology Group at the University of Cincinnati where his research focused on design and synthesis of colloidal and nanoparticle materials. After defending his thesis he went to work for the Procter & Gamble Company, leading their Crystallization group in the Corporate Engineering Division. In 2006 Pat formed P&G's Microfluidics and Structured Fluids group, supporting the scale-up and manufacture of complex fluid products for all of P&G's product areas. After 15 years with P&G, Pat joined UNSW in 2012 as an Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering where he, and Stuart Prescott, set up the Complex Fluids Group. 

Contact

+61 2 9385 5744

Research Activities

Shaped and Stimulus-Responsive Droplets for Improved Delivery

Project

Shaped and Stimulus-Responsive Droplets for Improved Delivery

This project is focused on applications like controlled delivery of softeners, nutrients, and drugs from droplets like those in a shampoo, food, or drug formulation.

Ice Cream Meltdown

Project

Ice Cream Meltdown

Everyone has experienced the sadness associated with melting ice cream, but there are actually some fascinating physics at work that determine the time it takes for a block of ice cream to melt and collapse under its own weight.

Yielding in Structured Fluids

Project

Yielding in Structured Fluids

Yield stress fluids are remarkable materials that behave like a solid until a certain level of stress is exerted on them, after which they flow like a fluid until the stress is removed.

Nanostructured Particle Formation during Fat Digestion and Drug Delivery

Project

Nanostructured Particle Formation during Fat Digestion and Drug Delivery

We have a number of possible projects in this area dealing with the fascinating self-assembly of monoglycerides in water, as occurs whenever we ingest and digest fats.

Food Emulsion Microstructure and Shape Effects

Project

Food Emulsion Microstructure and Shape Effects

The stability of many foods is based on, or affected by, emulsions arrested by colloids.