Researcher

Professor Chris Turney

Biography

Chris is a recently completed Australian Research Council Laureate Fellow and Professor of Climate Change and Earth Science at the University of New South Wales. Working across the globe, Chris is extending historic records back to 130,000 years ago to improve projections of future climatic and environmental change. As part of this work, Chris set up and co-ordinates the international Earth's Past Future Project. He is UNSW node Director and...view more

Chris is a recently completed Australian Research Council Laureate Fellow and Professor of Climate Change and Earth Science at the University of New South Wales. Working across the globe, Chris is extending historic records back to 130,000 years ago to improve projections of future climatic and environmental change. As part of this work, Chris set up and co-ordinates the international Earth's Past Future Project. He is UNSW node Director and Climate Theme Leader of the new Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodoversity and Heritage (CABAH) and is a member of the International radiocarbon Calibration group (IntCal). In UNSW, he is co-director of the Palaeontology, Geobiology and Earth Archives Research (PANGEA) Centre and is also a member of the Climate Change Research Centre (CCRC). Chris co-ordinates and teaches on GEOS3761 ‘Environmental Change’.

 

Chris has published more than 170 research papers, 1 textbook and 3 popular science books, attracting more than 14,000 citations. He has an H-index of 43 in Scopus (49 in Google), and 2 Highly Cited Papers listed in Thomson Reuters’ Essential Science Indicators. Described by the UK Saturday Times as the ‘new David Livingstone’, Chris’ team communicate their findings in the field as Intrepid Science, reporting discoveries when they happen, where they happen. Chris has received numerous awards, including the Australian Academy of Sciences Frederick Stone Award (2014), the Geological Society of London’s Bigsby Medal (2009), the PhilipLevehulme Prize (2008) and the International Union for Quaternary Research (INQUA) inaugural Sir Nicholas Shackleton Medal (2007). To do something positive about climate change, he helped set up a carbon refining company called CarbonScape  which has developed technology to fix carbon from the atmosphere and make a host of green bi-products.

 

Chris is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, the Royal Meteorological Society, the Geological Society of London, the Royal Geographical Society and the Higher Education Academy.

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Location

School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences (BEES)

Contact

+61 2 9385 8647
+61 2 9385 1558

Videos

Imagine a world of wildly escalating temperatures, apocalyptic flooding, devastating storms and catastrophic sea level rise. This might sound like a prediction for the future or the storyline of a new Hollywood blockbuster but it is something quite different: it’s our past. In a day and age when we’re bombarded with worrying forecasts for the future, it seems hard to believe that such things could come to pass. Yet almost everywhere we turn, the landscape is screaming out that the world is a capricious place. But if we don’t tune in, the message is lost. We need to decipher the past and learn from it.

Past environmental changes and their impacts are increasingly providing valuable insights into how our planet works. And it’s becoming evermore clear that nowhere is really isolated from anywhere else. From Sydney to the Arctic, seemingly unrelated parts of the world are connected in one way or another. The course GEOS3761 ‘Environmental Change’ is on offer at the University of New South Wales and designed to provide you with a critical understanding of past environmental change and what this means for the future.

I hope you can join us.