Professor Chris Turney

Professor Chris Turney

Campus: Kensington

Chris explores past climates and their relevance to future change. By developing and applying new methods to investigate natural archives across Australia and the globe as a whole, he is developing reconstructions that allow historical weather records to be extended beyond the mid-nineteenth century. Working with climate models, Chris is using these reconstructions to look into the mechanisms, timing and impact of extreme change in the past and future at regional and global scales.

Chris is...

Chris explores past climates and their relevance to future change. By developing and applying new methods to investigate natural archives across Australia and the globe as a whole, he is developing reconstructions that allow historical weather records to be extended beyond the mid-nineteenth century. Working with climate models, Chris is using these reconstructions to look into the mechanisms, timing and impact of extreme change in the past and future at regional and global scales.

Chris is on the international science steering committee for Past Global Changes (PAGES) [web link http://www.pages.unibe.ch/index.html] and since 2006, has been the Asian and Australasian Regional Editor for the Journal of Quaternary Science [web link: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/2507?CRETRY=1&SRETRY=0] (which has an impact factor of 3, making it the second highest ranking journal in Quaternary science).

In 2007, Chris was awarded the first Sir Nicholas Shackleton Medal by the International Union for Quaternary Research (INQUA) for outstanding Quaternary scientist for his pioneering research into past climate change and dating the past. He is also recipient of the 2008 Philip Leverhulme Prize for contributions to understanding the evolution of the Earth’s climate over the last 50,000 years and in 2009, was honoured with the 2009 Geological Society of London’s Bigsby Medal for services to geology.

Chris is a Fellow of the Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures & Commerce, the Geological Society of London and the Royal Geographical Society.

Chris has written two popular science books called Ice, Mud and Blood: Lessons from Climates Past [web link: http://us.macmillan.com/icemudandblood] and Bones, Rocks and Stars: the Science of When Things Happened [web link: http://us.macmillan.com/bonesrocksandstars].
Chris also has a popular science website at www.christurney.com.

Location

Climate Change Research Centre and School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences

Contact

+61 2 9385 8647
+61 2 9385 1558