Researcher

Professor Adam Micolich

My Expertise

Nanoelectronics, quantum devices, nanotechnology, physics, biophysics

Keywords

Field of Research (FoR)

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Biography

Adam works on the development of nanoscale electronic devices for applications in bioelectronics. This includes work on the development of microscopy-capable nanoelectronics for simultaneous optical/electrical study of biomolecules and devices and circuits for ion-to-electron signal transduction. He also has interests in mixed conductivity systems where both ions and electrons contribute to conduction and device function. He has been working...view more

Adam works on the development of nanoscale electronic devices for applications in bioelectronics. This includes work on the development of microscopy-capable nanoelectronics for simultaneous optical/electrical study of biomolecules and devices and circuits for ion-to-electron signal transduction. He also has interests in mixed conductivity systems where both ions and electrons contribute to conduction and device function. He has been working at UNSW since 2002, previously as an ARC Postdoctoral Fellow (2003 - 2006) and ARC Future Fellow (2010 - 2014) in the School of Physics. Adam has over 100 refereed research publications in areas ranging from physics to education research, and has recently co-edited two books on nanotechnology research in Australia.


My Grants

  • ARC Discovery Projects DP17: "Bioelectronic logic", A.P. Micolich, P. Meredith (Swansea U.), C. Prinz (Lund U.)
  • ARC Discovery Projects DP17: "Building up quantum electronics with tailored semiconductor nanostructures", A.P. Micolich & P. Caroff (ANU)
  • JSPS Long-term Invitational Fellowship 2019: "Nanowire transistor devices for single-molecule analysis of proton-pumping by biomolecular motors", H. Noji (U. Tokyo).

My Qualifications

Ph.D. in Physics, UNSW, 2001; B. Sc. (Hons) in Physics, UNSW, 1997.


My Awards


My Research Activities

  • Development of nanoscale electronics for single-molecule biophysics experiments.
  • Electronic properties of soft ionically-active materials for device applications (e.g., polymer electrolytes, ion gels).
  • Electronic properties of semiconductor nanowires and nanowire transistors.

My Research Supervision


Supervision keywords


Areas of supervision

My group's research is on nanoscale devices for bioelectronics applications with a strong current focus on developing devices compatible with advanced biological microscopy methods for simultaneous optical and electrical studies of single biomolecules. We are currently recruiting, more details at: https://newt.phys.unsw.edu.au/nanoelectronics/recruiting/PhD_Flyer_Aug20.pdf


Currently supervising

Three Ph.D. students on various topics related to nanoscale devices, with two due to soon graduate.


My Teaching

Currently teaching:

  • PHYS2111 Quantum Physics (T1 2020 & T1 2021)
  • PHYS2113 Classical Mechanics (T2 2020 & T2 2021)
  • PHYS1241 Higher Physics 1B Special (T2 2021).
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Location

Rm G57A, Old Main Building K15

Research Activities

This project aims to create new biophysical tools for single-molecule sensing by advancing the state-of-the-art in nanoscale bioelectronic devices. The goal is to generate novel bioelectronic devices optimised for fabrication on microscope coverslip (170 micron glass) for compatibility with new low-cost platforms for advanced biological microscopy. Expected outcomes include the first demonstration of nanoscale transistors that are a) interfaced to constrained area lipid bilayers for studying membrane proteins at single-molecule level and b) used for electrostatically detecting motile…

Bioelectronics is a frontier field which aims to connect biological systems with modern electronics and so create the next generation of biomedical devices. A key challenge in bioelectronics is transducing ion and electron signals using some form of biocompatible functional interface. This is a difficult task since ion and electron physics are different in many ways. This project will deliver new understanding of ion-electron interactions relevant to bioelectronics, and create novel transducing interfaces. By combining individual transducers, we will demonstrate ground-breaking…

This project aims to develop a new generation of nanoscale InAs/GaSb devices produced ‘from the bottom up’ using state-of-the-art 3D templated semiconductor growth methods. This material’s key feature is a pair of electron and hole layers separated by a few nanometers. These provide access to novel states of matter such as exciton condensates and topological insulators with potential applications in quantum information technologies. The project’s innovation is to template growth to give devices where the InAs/GaSb interface sits perpendicular to the device plane. This will enable…